The Understanding Slavery Initiative (USI) is a learning project from the UK which supports the teaching and learning of transatlantic slavery and its legacies using museum and heritage collections.

The International Slavery Museum is the only museum of its kind to look at aspects of historical and contemporary slavery as well as being an international hub for resources on human rights issues.

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on almost 36,000 slaving voyages

that forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans for transport to the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries.

 

In this TED ED animated video Anthony Hazard discusses the historical, economic and personal impact of the Atlantic slave trade -- which forcibly brought more than 10 million Africans to the Americas -- stands out for both its global scale and its lasting legacy.

Professor Fritz Umbach of John Jay College talks a little history behind the movie Adanggaman (2000). Umbach presents the role and power of African elites in the Atlantic slave trade.

 

The Slave Wreaks Project uses remains and archeology of slave ships to advance global scholarly and public understanding of the various vectors of the slave trade from Africa (Atlantic, Indian Ocean) that have played a foundational role in shaping global history.

In the documentary Traces of the Trade (2008) Producer/Director Katrina Browne tells the story of her forefathers, the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. Given the stereotype that the Southerners were solely responsible for slavery, viewers learn how Northerners like the Browne family were intimately involved in the slave trade.

This site looks at the Transatlantic Slave Trade and Thomas Clarkson and his fellow abolitionists who fought for emancipation of enslaved Africans in the British colonies.

Through essays, books, articles, maps, and illustrations this site shows how the story of the eradication of the international slave trade to the Americas was not straightforward. It did not happen overnight because laws were passed. It was a long, arduous, and tortuous process that spanned almost nine decades.